sábado, 8 de febrero de 2014

Salmonella Bacteria May Result from Improperly Microwaving Food

 An outbreak of Salmonella that occurred in 2010 and sickened 44 people has raised awareness for properly following directions when microwaving food. A new investigation of the outbreak has revealed some precautions. (Photo : Flickr)

An outbreak of Salmonella that occurred in 2010 and sickened 44 people has raised awareness for properly following directions when microwaving food. A new investigation of the outbreak has revealed some new findings.

Forty-four people in 18 states were infected with Salmonella, which was later traced to the consumption of "Marie Callender's" frozen chicken-and-rice meals. Shortly thereafter, the product was recalled.

But according the a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most of the people consuming these meals did not let the meal stand for the recommended time in the microwave. So although the meals may have been the culprit, the fact that many did not follow the proper protocol also did not help the cause.

A common misconception about frozen meals is that the food simply just needs to be reheated and can then be immediately consumed. This has also been a common denominator with foodborne-illness outbreaks.

"Microwave standing time is part of the cooking process," the report said in this Live Science article. "Consumers should not only follow instructions for microwaving, but should also allow the product to stand for the recommended time before consuming."

But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also believe that manufacturers need to clearly label that their product is not immediately ready to eat by providing a step-by-step process to properly prepare the meal. Also, consumers are recommended to know the wattage of their microwave because that determines the readiness of the food. It is also suggested that consumers use a food thermometer to ensure all contents of the meal have reached 165 degrees Fahrenheit, which indicates it is fully cooked. There are general instructions that consumers should know and follow when preparing any frozen meal, a important point the CDC elaborated upon.

To read the full CDC report on this issue, visit the December 6th issue of their "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly report by clicking here.

ORIGINAL: Science World Report
Thomas Carannante
By Feb 07, 2014

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario